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An excellent use of the term “Backstreets” as used in American suburbs | unclassified tempo map of Bruce Springsteen and the E-Street Band 1970s song

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Jason Thompson and MIshael Morgan in The Young and the Restless

Yesterday the writers at the Young and the Restless used the American suburb term “backstreets” in a way Bruce Springsteen did when he wrote about the streets of New Jersey.

There is an enthusiasm throughout that song that though Bruce and his love interest aren’t what we would call today “rich”, life was pretty damn good driving around freely on hidden backstreets at night just being with people you liked.

“Take On Me”, a-ha |unclassified tempo map of one of the most enthusiastic songs and creative videos ever made

One of the most enthusiastic songs and videos of the late 20th century was a-ha’s “Take On Me.”

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a-ha, Take On Me

It is known as one of the “truly great pop songs” of the era. This video is the great story of the song –

No comment I read in public said it better than this on YouTube┬« –

“The interesting thing here is that the song was composed before they even met Morten, and still it appears to be written exactly for his vocal range There are very few singers who have volume and expression across more than two octaves. The riff and the refrain were created independently from each other but still it all fits together so nicely and organically.”